Open Access

Erratum to: Physician reported incidence of early and late Lyme borreliosis

  • Agnetha Hofhuis1Email author,
  • Margriet Harms1,
  • Sita Bennema1,
  • Cees C. van den Wijngaard1 and
  • Wilfrid van Pelt1
Parasites & Vectors20158:378

https://doi.org/10.1186/s13071-015-0990-3

Received: 6 July 2015

Accepted: 6 July 2015

Published: 17 July 2015

The original article was published in Parasites & Vectors 2015 8:161

After the publication of this work [1], we noticed an error in the percentages of “Fig. 1 Lyme borreliosis manifestations as a proportion of all Lyme-related diagnoses, by type of physician”. The percentages of the first horizontal bar “General Practitioner (adjusted)” should be: 90.9 % erythema migrans (instead of 92 %), 5.3 % disseminated Lyme borreliosis, and 3.8 % persisting symptoms attributed to Lyme borreliosis (instead of 3 %).
Fig. 1

Lyme borreliosis manifestations as a proportion of all Lyme-related diagnoses, by type of physician

Consequently, the corresponding sentence in the results section should be: “After adjusting, erythema migrans represented 90.9 % of the clinical diagnoses for Lyme borreliosis reported by the GP, while 5.3 % of the diagnoses concerned disseminated Lyme borreliosis, and 3.8 % concerned persisting symptoms attributed to Lyme borreliosis (see Fig. 1)”.

And the corresponding sentence in the discussion section should be: “Considering all GP-reported Lyme borreliosis, 5.3 % of the diagnoses concerned disseminated Lyme borreliosis, and 3.8 % concerned persisting symptoms attributed to Lyme borreliosis (see Fig. 1).”

Notes

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Epidemiology and Surveillance Unit, Centre for Infectious Disease Control Netherlands, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM)

Reference

  1. Hofhuis A, Harms M, Bennema S, van den Wijngaard CC, van Pelt W. Physician reported incidence of early and late Lyme borreliosis. Parasit Vectors. 2015;8:161.PubMed CentralPubMedView ArticleGoogle Scholar

Copyright

© Hofhuis et al. 2015

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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